MacEdward Leach and the Songs of Atlantic Canada
Bung Your Eyes
Jacob Noseworthy NFLD 1 Tape 4A Track 5
Pouch Cove Audio:
Ballad / comic

To purchase a basket was Jack's first intent
To purchase a basket he was fully bent
And twenty bright shillings there he did pay
He took out the basket and dodged along laddie
Fol-de-diddle-laddie
Fol-de-darrel-oh-day

He dodged along 'til he came to his ship
'Twas come my good shipmates and let's have a drink
'Twas come my good shipmates come drink if you're dry
The best of good liquor they call 'Bung Your Eye' laddie
Fol-de-diddle-laddie
Fol-de-darrel-oh-day

To open the basket was Jack's neat intent
To gather spray on it he was fully bent
When he opened the basket he heard a child cry
Wrapped up in a blanket it was Bung Your Eye laddie
Fol-de-diddle-laddie
Fol-de-darrel-oh-day

To get the lad christened was Jack's next intent
To get a name for him he was fully bent
Said the parson to Jack I will christen your boy
But what will you call him said Jack 'Bung Your Eye laddie
Fol-de-diddle-laddie
Fol-de-darrel-oh-day

Bung Your Eye? Said the parson, sure that's a queer name
And damn it said Jack is it queer how it came
As I was a-going my sea-stock to buy
I got soaked in the liquor and I bought Bung Your Eye laddie
Fol-de-diddle-laddie
Fol-de-darrel-oh-day

(speaks) That's it.


Notes

Sources: Alternative title "Quare Bungo Rye"; Roud 2404                

History: British and Irish variants.

Text notes: There are two feasible interpretations of this text. In one, a sailor thinks he is buying whiskey but instead acquires a basket that has a baby in it. Hence, he names the baby "Bung your eyes" which is the name of the whisky he sought. A second interpretation is that the "basket" is a metaphor for a prostitute whom he gets pregnant. When the baby arrives, he names it after the whisky that he drank on the night in question.

Tune notes: A triple metre tune with a single line, vocable refrain.

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